Oct 27, 2021  
2021-2022 Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Catalog

School of Arts and Sciences


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School of Arts and Sciences
University West, Suite 208
3007 N Ben Wilson, Victoria, Texas 77901
Phone: 361.570.4201 Fax: 361.570.4207
Email: artssciences@uhv.edu

Mission

The School of Arts and Sciences seeks to provide high quality academic programs that serve the educational needs and offer lifelong learning opportunities primarily for those in the regions served by UH-Victoria and its off-campus sites. Research and service are also important parts of this school’s commitment to providing quality and excellence in
education.

The School of Arts and Sciences offers a variety of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs designed to serve different student needs. These degree programs provide the knowledge and skills students need to enter the workforce, make career transitions, advance in their chosen fields, or continue on to graduate school. In addition, students who want simply to improve basic skills, explore new interests, or enrich their understanding of the background and values of their culture can select from numerous courses in the school to enhance their education.

The School of Arts and Sciences strives to meet these commitments and continuously improve its offerings by:

  • Hiring and retaining highly qualified faculty who stay abreast in their field through research and professional development.
  • Providing students with access to advisors who help them design programs of study to meet their individual needs and goals.
  • Emphasizing the ethical values, conceptual knowledge, global and multicultural understanding, analytical skills, technical skills, and communication skills needed in the specific fields of study.
  • Assessing and revising programs and course offerings to ensure quality and to keep current with and anticipate changes in workforce, educational, and social needs.
  • Offering students hands-on learning opportunities such as internships, practica, laboratories, and class project collaborations with local organizations.
  • Ensuring that educational opportunities in the community are available and accessible through a variety of efforts including distance learning, off-campus sites, and weekend course offerings.
  • Participating in service and outreach activities that contribute to the educational enhancement of the students, school, university, system, the professions, and community served by UH-Victoria.


Arts & Sciences_Undergraduate Table of Programs  

Arts & Sciences_Graduate Table of Programs  
 


American Book Review

University Center, Suite 301
3007 N Ben Wilson, Victoria, Texas 77901
361.570.4101 Fax: 361.580.5501

Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Ph.D.
Publisher/Editor
361.570.4200 dileoj@uhv.edu

Jeffrey A. Sartain, Ph.D.
Managing Editor
361.570.4254 sartainj@uhv.edu

Joseberto Hernandez
Assistant Editor
361.570.4139 SchatzmanLA@uhv.edu

American Book Review was founded in October 1977 in Brooklyn, New York by the avant-garde novelist Ronald Sukenick and relocated to the University of Houston-Victoria in July 2006 after extended residencies at the University of Colorado-Boulder and Illinois State University in Normal.

The history of the American Book Review consists of nearly thirty years of continuous engagement with some of the most challenging, innovative and beautiful wordcraft in our literary tradition. Its editors and contributors form both a Who’s Who of the literary scene and an index of the powerful undercurrents in American publishing. The review has thrived because of the collective spirit that has dominated its editorial vision and publishing practice. At its core are writers writing about writers: people who live with words, who allow words to dominate their being. Part of the uniqueness and power of this publication is the critical window these contributors provide for our readers. ABR reviewers share a commitment to and passion for contemporary writing, which makes ABR a special venue to gain a perspective on the contemporary American literary horizon. The emphasis away from mainstream American publishing only makes ABR more attractive and valuable to its readers. Over the past decade alone, ABR has reviewed books published by over 200 independent presses, including literary presses and non-profit “small” presses. ABR is distributed in every section of the country, and its subscription list is both national and international. Readers and authors served by ABR represent a diverse mixture of genders, races, age groups, and ethnic and national backgrounds located all over the world.

ABR Reading Series

The ABR Reading Series features nationally recognized writers on a day-long visit to the Victoria campus that include a public reading of their recent work; audience Q&A and book signing; roundtable discussion with UHV faculty and students; master class consulting for graduate, upper-division, and high-school students; and receptions for university advancement.

Each author’s agenda is tailored to best meet the needs of UHV students and faculty as well as raise UHV’s profile by providing face-to-face interaction with the widely recognized writers, critics and experts who write and edit the American Book Review.  ABR Reading Series on-campus presentations and off-campus reading/receptions provide the community with unprecedented access to artists in an intimate, personal environment. In addition, area public and private high-school English students and teachers are invited to participate.

Friends of ABR Endowment

This project’s goal is to raise $1 million from local and regional individuals, foundations and corporations. Revenue generated by these endowment funds will support American Book Review’s on-going viability and permanent residence at UHV. Funds will also facilitate the development of undergraduate and graduate curriculum in the publishing arts.


Society for Critical Exchange

University Center, Suite 301
3007 N Ben Wilson, Victoria, Texas 77901
361.570.4101 Fax: 361.580.5501
Email: sce@uhv.edu

Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Ph.D.
Executive Director
361.570.4200
dileoj@uhv.edu

Horace L. Fairlamb, Ph.D.
Associate Director
361.570.4201
fairlambh@uhv.edu

Keri Ruiz
Assistant Director
361.570.4339
farnsworthKL@uhv.edu

The SCE is North America’s oldest scholarly organization devoted to theory. Its various interdisciplinary projects, conferences and symposia serve to advance the role of theory in academic and intellectual arenas. Its projects encompass a broad spectrum of disciplines, most prominently literary studies, legal studies and practices, economics, composition and pedagogy.

The SCE was founded in 1975 “to encourage cooperative inquiry and research in criticism and theory.” Among its founding members, Leroy Searle, James Sosnoski, and Patricia Harkin were especially important in giving the society direction during its early years, first at the University of Washington, Seattle (1976-81) and later at Miami University of Ohio (1982-90). The oldest and for many years the only scholarly society devoted specifically to theory, it was instrumental in the institutionalization of theory in North American literary studies, and has gone on to innovate across traditional boundaries of the humanities and social sciences.

The SCE is organized around collaborative, often interdisciplinary research “projects” initiated and operated by its (approximately 800) members. It has consistently been in the vanguard of such study, organizing programs in such areas as: the teaching of both theory and cultural studies; the role of men in feminism; disciplinary and professionalization, especially of literary studies the relation of authorship and the institutions of intellectual property; and, the relations of literature, culture, and economics. The most active current standing projects include: intellectual property and the construction of authorship; new economic criticism; cultures of writing; and woman, nation, narrative. New projects on the institutions of aesthetics, and globalization and the image are in their formative stages.

An extended history of the society is available as part of the Modern Language Association’s (MLA) audit of Allied and Affiliate Organizations.

As the host institution for the SCE, UHV aims to both continue the traditional practices of the organization as well as to expand the organizations operations in several ways. While the MLA and its sub-organizations are important venues for theoretical critical exchange, the SCE@UHV will additionally work to organize panels at the annual conferences of the following organizations: a) one annual meeting of the American Philosophical Association (which has three divisions, Eastern, Midwestern, Western); b) one annual meeting of a major comparative literature association (which has three major divisions, Southern Comparative Literature, American Comparative Literature Association, International Comparative Literature Association); and c) one annual meeting of a major communication association (which has two major divisions, the National Communication Association and the International Communication Association). These three disciplinary organizations would serve not only to expand the range of SCE critical engagement, but also would work to bring critical discourse that circles in these differing organizations into exchange with each other.

Also, as host for the SCE, UHV plans to develop a virtual SCE community. Nodes for critical discussion of particular topics will be created that will not only allow for the posting of articles, works in progress, etc., but also for posting various multimedia critical engagements. The SCE virtual community will allow for extended discussion of topics and the development of broader-based critical projects. It will also provide a forum for participation across the globe. Ideally, SCE nodes would be set up in a number of different parts of the world such as South America (Sao Paolo), Africa (Capetown), Europe (Paris), and Asia (Hong Kong).

Both the development of an SCE virtual community and the expansion of conference venues for critical exchange will would allow for more extensive participation from sister disciplines such as philosophy, comparative literature and communications. Such multi-disciplinary engagement would strengthen the SCE by bringing complementary voices into the organization.

Finally, the SCE@UHV will set up a winter theory institute at UHV. The institute would invite prominent speakers to a one week seminar during the second week of February. Students and faculty from around the country would be invited to participate. The themes of the winter institute could be connected to the projects developed through the SCE virtual community.


symploke

University West, Suite 206B
3007 N Ben Wilson, Victoria, Texas 77901
361.570.4339 Fax: 361.580.5501
Email: editor@symploke.org

Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Ph.D.
Editor-in-Chief
361.570.4200
dileoj@uhv.edu

Keri Ruiz
Managing Editor
361.570.4339
farnsworthKL@uhv.edu

symploke is an interdisciplinary critical theory journal. Its aim is to provide an arena for critical exchange between established and emerging voices in the field. It supports new and developing notions of comparative literature and theory, and is committed to interdisciplinary studies, intellectual pluralism, and open discussion. It is particularly interested in scholarship on the interrelations among philosophy, literature, culture criticism and intellectual history, though will consider articles on any aspect of the intermingling of discourses and disciplines.

symploke (www.symploke.org) has been continuously published for thirty years. It is published in print by the University of Nebraska Press, and online by the Johns Hopkins University Press. Its contributors and advisory board include many of the most prominent figures in the field. It is internationally distributed and can be found in libraries across the world.

The journal takes its name from the Greek word symploke, which has among its various meanings interweaving, interlacing, connection and struggle. The journal’s editors believe that continuing change in the humanities is contingent upon the interweaving, connection, and struggle between traditionally independent domains of discourse. One of symploke’s broader goals is to contribute to the opening of alternative academic frontiers by providing a forum for scholars of varying disciplines to engage in the intermingling of ideas in innovative ways. 

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